A gallery of my latest modern gravestone images won’t appear until December, when I’ve assembled a collection of those taken in the latter part of 2014. In the meantime, I’ve replaced one of the images in my “best of” gallery for this series with one I created last week:

Tweety Bird - New York

Tweety Bird – New York

While it’s probably not intentional, one interesting aspect of this monument is that it vaguely echoes art work that was common on Puritan gravestones:

NathanaelMatherCharterStreetBurialGroundSalem1688Gravestone

If you’d like to learn more about Puritan gravestone iconography, the City of Boston has a helpful web page. You can explore things even further in either a lighter (with photos) or heavier (with charts) vein. As these links demonstrate, Puritan cemetery folk art can be fascinating. And who knows? Maybe some day in the distant future historians will be similarly fascinated with the cemetery folk art from our time.

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