Dave Higgins Photography

Looking at life through nano-coated lenses

Posts tagged ‘Americana’

The winter of 2015 has been freakishly warm and dry in parts of Alaska, forcing the Iditarod race start from Willow (near Anchorage) north to Fairbanks. Fortunately, the ceremonial start proceeded as scheduled on March 7th in Anchorage. Since I was in the area for a ski trip, I spent the morning photographing the festivities.

Here’s a sampling of my photos from the day.

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Jessie Royer starts outJessie Royer starts out

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Izzy the Vaccination DogIzzy the Vaccination Dog. There appeared to be numerous tie-ins between the Iditarod and healthcare – possibly because the inspiration for the event was the 1925 dog team relay to get medicine to Nome to fight a diphtheria outbreak.

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Dog staging areaStaging area for one of the teams

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Travis Beals & friendsTravis Beals & friends

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Future Mushers?Future DeeDee Jonrowe?

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About to startLaura Allaway’s team at the start

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Laura Allaway heads offLaura Allaway heads off

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Maintaining the snow was a constant jobMaintaining the snow was a constant job

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Dogs of Isabelle Travadon, a rookie from FranceDogs of Isabelle Travadon, a rookie from France

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Thomas Waerner of Norway passes a dogteam muralThomas Waerner of Norway passes a dog team mural

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Two young fans in the crowdTwo young fans in the crowd have mixed reactions as a team goes by

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21-DeeDeeJonroweIsKnownForHerPinkOutfitCrowd favorite DeeDee Jonrowe, a breast cancer survivor, is known for her bright pink outfit

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Ray Redington Jr. waves to the crowdRay Redington Jr. waves to the crowd

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4th Avenue after all the teams have gone4th Avenue after all the teams have gone

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All photographs are © Dave Higgins and “Dave Higgins Photography,” 2015; all rights reserved.

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A gallery of my latest modern gravestone images won’t appear until December, when I’ve assembled a collection of those taken in the latter part of 2014. In the meantime, I’ve replaced one of the images in my “best of” gallery for this series with one I created last week:

Tweety Bird - New York

Tweety Bird – New York

While it’s probably not intentional, one interesting aspect of this monument is that it vaguely echoes art work that was common on Puritan gravestones:

NathanaelMatherCharterStreetBurialGroundSalem1688Gravestone

If you’d like to learn more about Puritan gravestone iconography, the City of Boston has a helpful web page. You can explore things even further in either a lighter (with photos) or heavier (with charts) vein. As these links demonstrate, Puritan cemetery folk art can be fascinating. And who knows? Maybe some day in the distant future historians will be similarly fascinated with the cemetery folk art from our time.

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I’ve continued work on this project in 2014; this is a collection of some of my favorites from the first half of the year. They were taken in upstate New York and Texas. You can find more images from this series on the As We Are Now series page.

This series is exploring the subject of modern cemetery folk art – both what is inscribed on gravestones and the artifacts of human emotion left by others, which could span a range from personal messages to loved ones to ordinary objects bearing some unknown significance. This project is also creating a record of how this folk art appears around the time it is created. As a visit to the older section of any cemetery will bear out, time and the elements inevitably take their toll on this kind of folk art.

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(Clicking on any image will open a slide show.)

All photographs are © Dave Higgins and “Dave Higgins Photography,” 2014; all rights reserved.

 

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I took many photographs for this project in 2013; this is a collection of some of my favorites from the year. They were taken in upstate New York, Vermont and Texas. You can find more images from this series on the As We Are Now series page.

In 2013 I continued exploring the subject of modern cemetery folk art from a somewhat broader (and hopefully deeper) perspective. I’ve increased my attention on artifacts of human emotion – which could span a range from personal messages to loved ones to a coffee cup bearing some unknown significance. This project is also creating a record of how this folk art appears around the time it is created. As a visit to the older section of any cemetery will bear out, time and the elements inevitably take their toll on this kind of folk art.

♦ ♦

(Clicking on any image will open a slide show.)

All photographs are © Dave Higgins and “Dave Higgins Photography,” 2014; all rights reserved.

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