Dave Higgins Photography

Looking at life through nano-coated lenses

Posts tagged ‘gravestones’

A gallery of my latest modern gravestone images won’t appear until December, when I’ve assembled a collection of those taken in the latter part of 2014. In the meantime, I’ve replaced one of the images in my “best of” gallery for this series with one I created last week:

Tweety Bird - New York

Tweety Bird – New York

While it’s probably not intentional, one interesting aspect of this monument is that it vaguely echoes art work that was common on Puritan gravestones:

NathanaelMatherCharterStreetBurialGroundSalem1688Gravestone

If you’d like to learn more about Puritan gravestone iconography, the City of Boston has a helpful web page. You can explore things even further in either a lighter (with photos) or heavier (with charts) vein. As these links demonstrate, Puritan cemetery folk art can be fascinating. And who knows? Maybe some day in the distant future historians will be similarly fascinated with the cemetery folk art from our time.

Leave a comment
I’ve continued work on this project in 2014; this is a collection of some of my favorites from the first half of the year. They were taken in upstate New York and Texas. You can find more images from this series on the As We Are Now series page.

This series is exploring the subject of modern cemetery folk art – both what is inscribed on gravestones and the artifacts of human emotion left by others, which could span a range from personal messages to loved ones to ordinary objects bearing some unknown significance. This project is also creating a record of how this folk art appears around the time it is created. As a visit to the older section of any cemetery will bear out, time and the elements inevitably take their toll on this kind of folk art.

♦ ♦

(Clicking on any image will open a slide show.)

All photographs are © Dave Higgins and “Dave Higgins Photography,” 2014; all rights reserved.

 

Leave a comment

This series was created with a poem by Percy Bysshe Shelley in mind:

OZYMANDIAS

I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said: `Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed.
And on the pedestal these words appear –
“My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!”
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.
– Percy Bysshe Shelley

♦ ♦

(Clicking on any image will open a slide show.)

♦ ♦

All photographs are © Dave Higgins and “Dave Higgins Photography,” 2014; all rights reserved.

Leave a comment

I took many photographs for this project in 2013; this is a collection of some of my favorites from the year. They were taken in upstate New York, Vermont and Texas. You can find more images from this series on the As We Are Now series page.

In 2013 I continued exploring the subject of modern cemetery folk art from a somewhat broader (and hopefully deeper) perspective. I’ve increased my attention on artifacts of human emotion – which could span a range from personal messages to loved ones to a coffee cup bearing some unknown significance. This project is also creating a record of how this folk art appears around the time it is created. As a visit to the older section of any cemetery will bear out, time and the elements inevitably take their toll on this kind of folk art.

♦ ♦

(Clicking on any image will open a slide show.)

All photographs are © Dave Higgins and “Dave Higgins Photography,” 2014; all rights reserved.

Leave a comment

If you Google “gravestone art photograph” you’ll find a variety of things, including many photos of old stones and some artsy photos that tend toward the gothic. But you’ll also find “Drop Dead Gorgeous: Ten Types Of Tombstones To Die For” – an interesting and entertaining photo collection of gravestones from different places and times. I wouldn’t go so far as to say they’re all really “drop dead gorgeous” but the web page is an interesting change of pace. Check it out!

Leave a comment